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South Hampshire

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Latest News

Next Meeting

The South Hampshire Area meet on the 2nd Wednesday of the month:

 

8.00pm Salon bar at the Golden Lion PO17 6EB in the village of Southwick (Pronounced Suthwyk)

 

(Unless ordered otherwise by General Mayhem)  

 

We really are a friendly bunch and welcome guests.

 

 

 

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Military Vehicle Trust

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SOUTH HAMPSHIRE MVT FACEBOOK PAGE

 

The South Hampshire Military Vehicle Trust now have our very own FaceBook page, why not search us out and follow us @Southhantsmvt

 

 

D-DAY COMMEMORATIVE CONVOY

 

The event will start at Southwick House on 25th June 2022 near Fareham in Hampshire and run to Milestones Museum in Basingstoke, a distance of about 37 miles.  The object of the event is to raise funds for the Royal British Legion Riders’ Branch.

 

In order to avoid too much difficulty with traffic regulations the convoy may have to be restricted to 60 vehicles, which should be of Second World War vintage and of all allied nations.

 

Entry forms with full details will be sent nearer the time.

SOUTH HAMPSHIRE MVT AGM

 

The South Hampshire Military Vehicle Trust give notice of our AGM being held on 10th November 2021 8.00pm Salon bar Golden Lion Southwick.

 

Any Member wishing to stand for election must notify the Area Secretary ASAP

CLUB MEETINGS

 

The South Hampshire Area meet on the 2nd Wednesday of the month:

 

8.00pm Salon bar at the Golden Lion PO17 6EB in the village of Southwick (Pronounced Suthwyk) we really are a friendly bunch and welcome guests.

AGM

Welcome

The Jeep

 

By now the war was under way in Europe, so the Army's need was urgent and demanding: Bids were to be received by July 22, a span of just eleven days. Manufacturers were given 49 days to submit their first prototype and 75 days for completion of 70 test vehicles. The Army's Ordnance Technical Committee specifications were equally demanding: the vehicle would be four wheel drive and have a crew of three on a wheelbase of no more than 75 in (1,905 mm) – that was later upped to 80 in (2,032 mm) – and track no more than 47 in (1,194 mm), feature a fold-down windshield, 660 lb (299 kg) payload and be powered by an engine capable of 85 lb•ft (115 N•m) of torque. The most daunting demand, however, was an empty weight of no more than 1,300 lb (590 kg).

Initially, only two companies entered: American Bantam Car Company and Willys-Overland Motors; Ford Motor Company joined the competition later.

Though Willys-Overland was the low bidder, Bantam received the bid, being the only company committing to deliver a pilot model in 49 days and production examples in 75. Under the leadership of designer Karl Probst, Bantam built their first prototype, dubbed the "Blitz Buggy" (and in retrospect "Old Number One"), and delivered it to the Army vehicle test center at Camp Holabird, Maryland on September 23, 1940. This presented Army officials with the first of what eventually evolved into the World War II U.S. Army Jeeps: the Willys MB and Ford GPW.

For these respective pre-production runs, each vehicle received revisions and a new name. Bantam's became the BRC 40. Production began on March 31, 1941, with a total of 2,605 built up to December 6. [As the company could not meet the Army's demand for 75 Jeeps a day, production contracts were also awarded to Willys and to Ford.

Since Bantam did not have the production capacity or fiscal stability to deliver on the scale needed by the War Department, the other two bidders, Ford and Willys, were encouraged to complete their own pilot models for testing. The contract for the new reconnaissance car was to be determined by trials. As testing of the Bantam prototype took place from September 27 to October 16, Ford and Willys technical representatives present at Holabird were given ample opportunity to study the vehicle's performance. Moreover, in order to expedite production, the War Department forwarded the Bantam blueprints to Ford and Willys, claiming the government owned the design.

Bantam did not dispute this move due to its precarious financial situation. By November 1940, Ford and Willys each submitted prototypes to compete with the Bantam in the Army's trials. The pilot models, the Willys Quad and the Ford Pygmy, turned out very similar to each other and were joined in testing by Bantam's entry, now evolved into a Mark II called the BRC 60. By then the U.S. and its armed forces were already under such pressure that all three cars were declared acceptable and orders for 1,500 units per company were given for field testing. At this time it was acknowledged the original weight limit (which Bantam had ignored) was unrealistic, and it was raised to 2,160 lb (980 kg).

BantamBRC60

Bantam BRC60

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Willys MA

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Ford GP

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