975 mvt 699948_800c2307a701432183aa676ac481febb

South Hampshire

975

© SHMVT 2016 | All Rights Reserved | Web Design By Fareham Website Design

Latest News

Next Meeting

The South Hampshire Area meet on the 2nd Wednesday of the month:

 

8.00pm Salon bar at the Golden Lion PO17 6EB in the village of Southwick (Pronounced Suthwyk)

 

(Unless ordered otherwise by General Mayhem)  

 

We really are a friendly bunch and welcome guests.

 

 

 

new_raised_mvt_logo

Military Vehicle Trust

image001

SOUTH HAMPSHIRE MVT FACEBOOK PAGE

 

The South Hampshire Military Vehicle Trust now have our very own FaceBook page, why not search us out and follow us @Southhantsmvt

 

 

D-DAY COMMEMORATIVE CONVOY

 

The event will start at Southwick House on 25th June 2022 near Fareham in Hampshire and run to Milestones Museum in Basingstoke, a distance of about 37 miles.  The object of the event is to raise funds for the Royal British Legion Riders’ Branch.

 

In order to avoid too much difficulty with traffic regulations the convoy may have to be restricted to 60 vehicles, which should be of Second World War vintage and of all allied nations.

 

Entry forms with full details will be sent nearer the time.

SOUTH HAMPSHIRE MVT AGM

 

The South Hampshire Military Vehicle Trust give notice of our AGM being held on 10th November 2021 8.00pm Salon bar Golden Lion Southwick.

 

Any Member wishing to stand for election must notify the Area Secretary ASAP

CLUB MEETINGS

 

The South Hampshire Area meet on the 2nd Wednesday of the month:

 

8.00pm Salon bar at the Golden Lion PO17 6EB in the village of Southwick (Pronounced Suthwyk) we really are a friendly bunch and welcome guests.

AGM

The Jeep

Welcome

Origin of the term "jeep"

 

One account of the origin of the term "jeep" begins when the prototypes were being proven at military bases. The term "jeep" was used by Army mechanics for any untried or untested vehicles.

 

"Jeep" was also used for several types of heavier equipment. In the armor branch, "jeep" generally referred to a 1/2 or 3/4 ton truck, with the 1/4 ton called a "peep."

 

The militarized Minneapolis-Moline tractor was known as a "jeep," named for the cartoon character. Finally, heavy equipment transporters -gooseneck lowbed trucks for oversize, overweight cargoes, were known as "jeeps" by 1940.

 

Although folk etymology claims that it was due to slurring of an unused acronym, "GP" for "General Purpose", (The military do not make general purpose vehicles, they all have purpose) a more likely part of the jeep name came from the fact that the vehicle made quite an impression on soldiers at the time, so much so that they informally named it after Eugene the Jeep, a character in the Popeye comic strip and cartoons created by E.C. Segar as early as mid-March 1936. Eugene the Jeep was Popeye's "jungle pet" and was "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems".

 

 

 

In early 1941, Willys-Overland staged a press event in Washington, D.C., having the car demonstrate its prowess by driving up the Capitol steps. Irving "Red" Hausmann, a test driver on the Willys development team who had accompanied the car for its testing at Camp Holabird, had heard soldiers there referring to it as a jeep.

 

He was enlisted to go to the event and give a demonstration ride to a group of dignitaries, including Katherine Hillyer, a reporter for the Washington Daily News. When asked by the reporter, Hausmann said "it's a Jeep". Hillyer's article appeared in the newspaper on February 20, 1941, with a photo showing a jeep going up the Capitol steps and a caption including the term "jeep". This is believed to be the most likely origin of the term being fixed in public awareness. Even though Hausmann did not create or invent the word "Jeep", he very well could be the one most responsible for its first news media usage.

After reducing the vehicle's weight by 240 pounds, Willys changed the designation to "MA" for "Military" model "A". The Fords went into production as "GP", with "G" for a "Government" type contract and "P" commonly used by Ford to designate any passenger car with a wheelbase of 80 in (2,032 mm).

 

By July 1941, the War Department desired to standardize and decided to select a single manufacturer to supply them with the next order for 16,000 vehicles. Willys won the contract mostly due to its more powerful engine (the “Go Devil”), which soldiers raved about, and its lower cost and silhouette.

 

The design features in the Bantam and Ford entries which represented an improvement over Willys's design were then incorporated into the Willys car, moving it from an "A" designation to "B", thus the Willys "MB" nomenclature. Most notable was a flat wide hood, adapted from Ford GP later designated GPW to include referance to the Willys design.

jeep Magical powers Jeep-driving-up-stairs YouTube-logo-full_color

1936 'Popeye' cartoons